Pupil Premium

Background

 

The Pupil premium  was introduced by the Coalition Government in April 2011 to provide additional support for looked after children and those from low income families-this is defined as those who are currently eligible for Free school meals. 

It’s based on findings that show that, as a group, children who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in time have consistently lower educational attainment than those who have never been. It’s important to know that a pupil does not need to have a school dinner, but the parents/carers should check to see if they are entitled. 

It also includes pupils who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last six years; children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months; and children where a parent is in the armed forces. 

First introduced in April 2011, the level of premium in 2011-2012 was £488 per pupil; it increased to £600 per pupil in 2012-2013, then to £900 for 2013-2014 (increased to £953 mid year) and then to £1,300 per pupil 2014-2015. This money is for schools to decide how to use but should be spent in order to improve educational attainment of children from less privileged backgrounds. The pupil premium has the potential to have a great impact on attainment, and future life chances, of pupils.

How we spend the pupil premium: 

From 2016-17, in line with Government requirements, Kerr Mackie’s Pupil Premium Strategy will continue to support ‘disadvantaged pupils’ but will also ensure that other pupils, who require additional provision to raise their achievement levels, benefit too. Data outcomes have been used to underpin the strategy, complement the identification of barriers to learning and devise the interventions to address the barriers. Impact will be measured using the outcome data too. 

What impact has it had over the years? 

We monitor the outcomes of our support on an ongoing basis. The following is a summary of achievement and attainment.  

2015 data shows that:

·     After analysis of key stage 2 performance for different groups of pupils in school, the value added score of children entitled to pupil premium was simular to the national for reading and maths and just below for writing. The % attaining level 4+ rose in reading, writing and maths.    

2014 data shows that:

·     After analysis of key stage 2 performance for different groups of pupils in schools the value added score of children entitled to pupil premium was below the national for all subjects (reading, writing and maths).  In individual subjects, the value added was above the national in maths and below in writing and reading. 

2013 data shows that:

·     After analysis of key stage 2 performance for different groups of pupils in school, the value added score of children entitled to pupil premium was above the national for all subjects (reading, writing, maths).  In individual subjects, the value added was above the national in maths and writing and below in reading.